Let Sound Sleep: A Sound Approach to Healing

When Anil Jethmal tells people that he contracted typhoid at age eight while living in India, he gets a variety of responses. Some shudder at the ominous sound of the word typhoid. Typhoid, Anil retorts, is nothing more than bacterial food poisoning – very treatable. Most people, however, are particularly aghast at the notion of his having to deal with what they perceive to be a serious illness – in an Indian hospital.

Anil Jethmal is amused at both reactions. In particular, his amusement emanates from the false presumption that Indian hospitals are vastly inferior to those in the US.

To that point, forty years later, what Anil remembers most about his weeklong hospital stay was the luxury and serenity of the Indian hospital. His well-appointed and placid room overlooking the Arabian Sea had all the bearings of a world class luxury resort. Anil Jethmal’s doctor explained that that was a part of the healing process.

The opulence at the hospital was not simply extravagance for extravagance’s sake. Indian philosophy in healthcare stresses that, in addition to medical attention, the body can best fight off illness if it is well rested and is in a pleasant area free of germs. Human physiology, they reason, knows best how to heal itself. The white blood cells in our bodies know exactly what to do and where to go if disease is present.

This may all seem extremely obvious, even to a layperson. Yet, anyone who has had an overnight stay in a US hospital knows uninterrupted sleep is a virtual impossibility. Moreover, most of these hospitals are festered with germs. In fact, oftentimes hospital policy denies access to children under a certain age, due to children’s natural lower immunity and thus their heightened susceptibility of being afflicted with an airborne illness.

In such an environment where rest is difficult, patients’ white blood cells are not optimized. Worse, the limited white blood cells that a patient has to combat illness, now have to fight a war on two fronts- the germs within the body and also, the germs in the hospital.

Anil Jethmal recalls having a conversation with his US general practitioner about the paradox between the intent of many US hospitals and the physical condition of the very same facilities. Far from being offended by the comparison, he offered his own explanation.

US hospitals, he theorized, besides trying to help with patients’ medical needs are also corporations in the business of maximizing profits. One of the success metrics for a hospital is profitability per square foot – hence the incentive of hospital owners and administrators to opt for close quarters. The close quarters, unfortunately, compromise not only a patient’s rest, but also, the germ free environment that is ideal for a patient. This dual compromise leads to longer hospital stays – and thus higher billings to the patient’s insurance company.

Clearly, from a patient’s standpoint, a more restful stay with a shorter recovery time is preferable. However, both concluded their robust conversation wondering whether from a profit standpoint, an eastern medical philosophy is preferable. While such a resolution might seem quixotic, it is certainly worth a look.
By the way, eight-year old Anil Jethmal recovered quickly from his bout with typhoid, had a very pleasant hospital stay and, after asking, was told that the hospital bill was very reasonable.

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Two Weeks in December 1971

In December, 1971, Anil Jethmal was 6 years old and living in Bombay, India. He remembers the sirens that would wail in the middle of the night and he knew what had to be done. India was at war with Pakistan. The sirens were notice that enemy aircraft were approaching the city. As his parents would light a solitary candle for illumination and then turn out all lights in the house, Anil would gather his black opaque construction sheets of paper and start taping them onto all the windows in the house.
This was the plan of the Indian military. They reasoned that if the enemy could not see light emanating from the city, it would thwart their military efforts. Perhaps they were correct. Within a period of two weeks, Pakistan conceded military defeat to India.
During those two weeks, daytime was a very different experience for a young Anil Jethmal. Both his parents and he had friends who were Hindus and Muslims. Yet, even during the tension of war, they maintained amicable relationships with their Muslim friends and acquaintances.
Reflecting back on those two weeks, a much older Anil Jethmal, recalls the absence of social tension in Bombay, and indeed India, between Muslims and Hindus. True, this was not a war waged upon the premise of religious ideology. It was a war to liberate the people of Bangladesh from an oppressive Pakistani regime. Still, the absence of hostilities among the citizenry during that period was especially remarkable when one factors in that Muslims have an ancient history of aggressive proselytization.
Moreover, even the Indian government, in the Simla Agreement of 1972, as a gesture of goodwill, returned to Pakistan over 5700 square miles of territory it had gained in the war.
Forty-five years later, Anil Jethmal wonders if there are any lessons to be learned from this conflict for global society at large. In an age where there are so many religions, races and creeds at odds with each other, and tensions running so high, Anil can’t help but think back to those two weeks in December 1971. While he yearns for a like resolution, he has, like so many, no practical suggestions or answers.

Fine Cuisine with Character: An Unbeatable Combination

Beef Wellington
                     Source: lila dobbs

Between the ages of 25-40, Anil Jethmal recalls that he ate exactly one meal that was “cooked” at home. It was Beef Wellington that arrived at his home via FedEx and was packed in dry ice. The instructions read to bake in a pre-heated oven for 35 minutes. It was memorable only because, back then, Anil believed that he had cooked his first meal. (How to actually make Beef Wellington at home: Video by Gordon Ramsay)

As an individual whose clients were used to the best, Anil constantly dined at restaurants over which Zagats and even Michelin have gushed.

There were many restaurant meals where Anil found that the cuisine was outstanding, the décor was stunning and the service was impeccable. However, there was a common thread that made a small handful even more memorable. They also had history and/or character.

In no particular order, here are Anil’s favorite restaurant meals:

One if by Land, Two if by Sea Restaurant
                  Source: Zagat.com

One if by Land, Two if by Sea               New York
The restaurant was the carriage house of Aaron Burr (the very same man who killed Alexander Hamilton in a pistol duel).

Anil Jethmal recommends:
Oysters with shallot mignonette (with a shot of ice cold vodka or a glass of champagne). The main course has to be Beef Wellington

 

La Tour d’Argent                                                         Paris
The restaurant was founded in 1582. It was frequented by Henri IV. Request a table overlooking Notre Dame. The owner of La Tour d’Argent pays the electric bill so that the cathedral remains lit all night for his patrons’ viewing pleasure.

Anil Jethmal recommends:
The Pressed Duck. It is the signature dish that actually comes with a numbered certificate. Order the soufflé early since it takes an hour to prepare – Chocolate or Grand Marnier – impossible to go wrong. After dinner, take a walk along the Seine and take in the City of Lights.

Savoy Grill                                                                     London
Has the best view of the Thames River of any restaurant in London. Great place to go for dinner and dancing. Men, wear a tuxedo.

Anil Jethmal recommends:
The Chateaubriand for two.

Imago                                                                                Rome
Located atop the Hassler Hotel by the Spanish Steps. Have a drink on the terrace before the sun goes down. For those with good memories, henceforth every time they have that same drink, no matter where they are in the world, they will remember Rome…the way the sun hits the buildings in the afternoon.

Anil Jethmal recommends:
The Tandoori Duck

Sharkys                                                                            Bali
Ask for your table to be placed on the sand, secluded from others overlooking the Indian Ocean. Ask the roving band to play Hotel California or New York, New York. They know every word of the songs even though it is obvious that they do not speak a word of English.

Anil Jethmal recommends:
The Grilled Shrimp in Butter Pepper Garlic Sauce with ice cold Bintang Balinese beer.

Trishna                                                                            Mumbai
Bill & Hillary’s favorite restaurant in India.

Anil Jethmal recommends:
The Lobster in Chilly Garlic Sauce. Also, if you are squeamish, tell the waiter that you do not want to inspect the live lobster at your table before it is cooked.

Mandarin Oriental                                                       Manila
Call ahead to make sure Imelda Marcos is not dining. She goes often for the crispy duck and pancakes and her entourage is huge. If so, the wait for a table can be long.

Anil Jethmal recommends:
The Crispy Duck & Pancakes, of course.

Blue Hill at Stone Barns                                          Pocantico Hills, NY
Arrive early and walk the former Rockefeller Estate. Absolutely everything that chef/owner Dan Barber serves is grown or raised at the working farm.

Anil Jethmal recommends:
The blood orange margarita and the blackcurrant martini are both delicious cocktails. Of course, both the blood orange and the blackcurrants are grown at the farm and are picked minutes before serving. The same theme extends to the main courses. Order the tasting menu.  The restaurant is 45 minutes door to door from Grand Central – no need to drive.

Giving Back For The Greater Good: A Necessary Ingredient For True Professional Success

Anil Jethmal is featured in Simon & Schuster’s The Winner’s Circle 2: How Ten Stockbrokers Became the Best In the Business. He, however, points out that he is not even the most successful person in his own family.

His father, who had no formal training in law, successfully argued a case in the Supreme Court in the Philippines to redefine agency ownership of fixed property by permanent resident aliens. In order to pass the bar in the Philippines, Anil Jethmal proudly points out, prospective lawyers need to study his father’s work. Anil’s father, the most principled person he ever knew, drew his own pride from feeding entire starving villages across India.
Anil’s grandfather founded, grew and, for three decades, ran the largest domestic electronics company in India. He was affectionately referred to as “The Baron” for all his charitable work throughout the country.

Anil Jethmal’s younger cousin is a self-made billionaire at age 44. He has earned hundreds of millions of dollars each in two separate companies in two completely different industries. More than that, he did it in two different countries. In both cases, he started from scratch, and not only taught himself each business, but has revolutionized the way all others following him now conduct business in each arena. Along the way, he has found the time and energy to do tremendous charitable work for senior citizen housing and education for the visually impaired.

Another cousin co-founded a company that The Independent proclaimed as one of the top ten music venues in the world, ranking among the Sydney Opera House in Australia and Madison Square Garden in New York City. Along the way, he has designed and executed a music and arts program to expose children to social issues like Women’s Rights and Celebrating Special Needs Children. His programs have reached and benefitted hundreds of thousands of needy children across India.

While Anil Jethmal has worked one on one with mentally challenged children in Southern Maine through Bowdoin College’s Project BARC, and has tutored economically disadvantaged children in Harlem, New York, his goal is to give back to society on a much larger scale. That, he proudly points to his family’s achievements, is true and complete professional success.